House for sale in drogheda, louth - 215000 eur



Description

This excellent 3 bedroom end-terrace residence is an ideal family home situated in grange rath, drogheda, co. louth. the well planned and spacious interiors are flooded with natural light and extend to c. 105 sq m (1,130 sq ft). the living room and kitchen/dining areas are of generous proportions and good dimensions. 24 park square is presented in immaculate condition and is tastecompletely decorated boasting a south-west facing landscaped rear garden. briefly, this is a quality home in a prime family location within easy access of schools, shopping, the m1 motorway and bus routes into both drogheda and dublin city centre. located within a stroll of south gate shopping centre (dunnes stores, butchers, newsagents, etc), grange rath is located just off the dublin road where you can find drogheda train station.

features
3 bedroom end-terrace
built c. 2004
extends to c. 105 sq m (c.1,130 sq ft)
g-f-c-h
gas fire
south-west facing rear orientation
landscaped rear garden
completely alarmed

accommodation includes
entrance hallway
living room (3.37m x 5.54m)
kitchen (3.87m x 2.48m)
dining area (3.40m x 3.02m)
utility (1.25m x 1.20m)
guest wc (1.42m x 1.35m)

1st floor
landing
main bedroom (3.93m x 3.34m)
en suite (1.05m x 1.70m)
bedroom 2 (3.10m x 4.01m)
bedroom 3 (2.35m x 2.85m)
main bathroom (2.00m x 2.07m)

viewing details
strictly by appointment with the sole selling agentfeatures:gas fire south-west facing rear orientation g-f-c-h extends to c. 105 sq m (c.1,130 sq ft) 3 bedroom end-terrace





Type of deal: For sale
Zip Code:: End of terrace house
Vote
Result 5 Estrellas 1 votes for House for sale in drogheda, louth - 215000 eur

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Drogheda (; ; Irish: Droichead Átha, meaning "bridge of the ford") is one of the oldest towns in Ireland, known for its tourism and as a centre of industry and medical care. It is located in County Louth on the Dublin-Belfast corridor on the east coast of Ireland, 49 km or 30 miles north of Dublin. It is the last bridging point on the River Boyne before it enters the Irish Sea.The UNESCO World Heritage Site of Newgrange is located 8 km to west of the town.
As the River Boyne divides the dioceses of Armagh and Meath, Drogheda was founded as two separate towns, Drogheda-in-Meath (for which a charter was granted in 1194) and Drogheda-in-Oriel (or 'Uriel') as County Louth was then known. In 1412 these two towns were united and Drogheda became a 'County Corporate', styled as 'the County of the Town of Drogheda'. Drogheda continued as a County Borough until the setting up of County Councils, through the enactment of the Local Government (Ireland) Act 1898, which saw all of Drogheda, including a large area south of the Boyne, become part of an extended County Louth. With the passing of the County of Louth and Borough of Drogheda (Boundaries) Provisional Order, 1976, County Louth again grew larger at the expense of County Meath. The boundary was further altered in 1994 by the Local Government (Boundaries) (Town Elections) Regulations 1994. The 2007–2013 Meath County Development Plan recognises the Meath environs of Drogheda as a primary growth centre on a par with Navan.
In recent years Drogheda's economy has diversified from its traditional industries, with an increasing number of people employed in the retail, services and technology sectors. The town also has a community of independent artists and musicians who have been looking to the local economy rather than Dublin for employment. Drogheda was also selected to host Fleadh Cheoil na hÉireann 2018.Ireland (; Irish: Éire [ˈeːɾʲə]; Ulster-Scots: Airlann [ˈɑːrlən]) is an island in the North Atlantic. It is separated from Great Britain to its east by the North Channel, the Irish Sea, and St George's Channel. Ireland is the second-largest island of the British Isles, the third-largest in Europe, and the twentieth-largest on Earth.
Politically, Ireland is divided between the Republic of Ireland (officially named Ireland), which covers five-sixths of the island, and Northern Ireland, which is part of the United Kingdom, in the northeast of the island. In 2011, the population of Ireland was about 6.4 million, ranking it the second-most populous island in Europe after Great Britain. Just under 4.6 million live in the Republic of Ireland and just over 1.8 million live in Northern Ireland.
The island's geography comprises relatively low-lying mountains surrounding a central plain, with several navigable rivers extending inland. The island has lush vegetation, a product of its mild but changeable climate which avoids extremes in temperature. Thick woodlands covered the island until the Middle Ages. As of 2013, the amount of land that is wooded in Ireland is about 11% of the total, compared with a European average of 35%. There are twenty-six extant mammal species native to Ireland. The Irish climate is very moderate and classified as oceanic. As a result, winters are milder than expected for such a northerly area. However, summers are cooler than those in Continental Europe. Rainfall and cloud cover are abundant.
The earliest evidence of human presence in Ireland is dated at 10,500 BC. Gaelic Ireland had emerged by the 1st century CE. The island was Christianised from the 5th century onward. Following the Norman invasion in the 12th century, England claimed sovereignty over Ireland. However, English rule did not extend over the whole island until the 16th–17th century Tudor conquest, which led to colonisation by settlers from Britain. In the 1690s, a system of Protestant English rule was designed to materially disadvantage the Catholic majority and Protestant dissenters, and was extended during the 18th century. With the Acts of Union in 1801, Ireland became a part of the United Kingdom. A war of independence in the early 20th century was followed by the partition of the island, creating the Irish Free State, which became increasingly sovereign over the following decades, and Northern Ireland, which remained a part of the United Kingdom. Northern Ireland saw much civil unrest from the late 1960s until the 1990s. This subsided following a political agreement in 1998. In 1973 the Republic of Ireland joined the European Economic Community while the United Kingdom, and Northern Ireland, as part of it, did the same.
Irish culture has had a significant influence on other cultures, especially in the fields of literature. Alongside mainstream Western culture, a strong indigenous culture exists, as expressed through Gaelic games, Irish music, and the Irish language. The culture of the island also shares many features with that of Great Britain, including the English language, and sports such as association football, rugby, horse racing, and golf.Louth is the name of several locations around the world:
Australia
Louth, New South Wales, Australia
Louth Bay, a bay in South Australia
Louth Bay, South Australia, a locality

Canada
Louth, Ontario
Ireland
County Louth, Ireland
Louth, County Louth, a village in the heart of the county Louth
County Louth Historic Names, Listing of historically documented names for Louth, village & county
Louth (Parliament of Ireland constituency) (1692–1801)
County Louth (UK Parliament constituency) (1801–1885, 1918–1922), Ireland
North Louth (UK Parliament constituency) (1885–1918)
South Louth (UK Parliament constituency) (1885–1918)
Louth (Dáil Éireann constituency), Ireland

United Kingdom
Louth, Lincolnshire, England
Louth, Lincolnshire (UK Parliament constituency) (1885–1983), in England		

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/


215000.00 Euro €
Ireland, Louth
Drogheda,
24 Park Square

Published: June 25, 2017
Total Views: 227

Shane Black B.sc (hons) Miavi
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